How It All Started

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 Peninsula Hardwood Mulch, Inc. was founded by Larry and Anna Wilson in September 1987. We started on route 17 in Yorktown, at which time we did lawn care. In 1990 we started the tree care service and moved to our current location in Yorktown on Lakeside Drive. In 1991 we started making our own topsoil at our new location. 1996 was a busy year for us, as we purchased the property formally know as Sheldon Lumber. This added to our already expanding Yorktown location. By purchasing Sheldon Lumber, we were now able to start processing our own mulch! In 1996 we started to phase out of the lawn care and tree care services because we felt it was unfair to compete with our wholesale customers. In this time the Wilson's had realized that their passion was mulch, topsoil and plants to say the least. In 2014 we opened our 3rd location in Poquoson. This location allows us to be closer to our Hampton customers and in the heart of Poquoson. And in 2019 we opened our newest location in Gloucester. Our Gloucester location, like our Yorktown location both offer a full stock nursery.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much area will one cubic yard of mulch cover?

How much area will one cubic yard of mulch cover?

How much area will one cubic yard of mulch cover?

If you are covering the area with a 3" depth then 1 cubic yard of mulch will cover 100 square feet. If you only want to cover the area 2" in depth, 1 cubic yard will cover 150 square feet 

 

*3" of mulch is recommended in your flowerbeds to help retain moisture for your plants, to help with weed control and to keep your plants root system warm in the colder months 

How often should I top-dress my flowerbeds?

How much area will one cubic yard of mulch cover?

How much area will one cubic yard of mulch cover?

It is recommended to top-dress your flower beds twice a year. It is most common to do this in the spring and then again in the fall. 

What type of soil should I use in my flowerbeds?

How much area will one cubic yard of mulch cover?

What type of soil should I use in my flowerbeds?

We have 2 different types of soil that we recommend for flowerbeds. The first is the Topsoil with soil Conditioner. This is an organic amended soil that is great for gardening. The second is the Topsoil Compost Blend. This is a 50/50 mixture of our Topsoil with Soil Conditioner and the Bio-com Compost. This soil with give your grass that extra boost of nutrients. 

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What soil should I use in my vegetable garden?

Some formulas you may need to figure out the amount of material you need for your project:

What type of soil should I use in my flowerbeds?

Just like your flowerbeds, you can use either the Topsoil with Soil conditioner or the Topsoil compost Blend. The Blend will give your vegetables that extra boost of nutrients. 

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When should I top-dress my lawn and what should I use?

Some formulas you may need to figure out the amount of material you need for your project:

Some formulas you may need to figure out the amount of material you need for your project:

We have a few different materials you can use when top-dressing your lawn. The highest recommended one is the Bio-com Compost. You can also use the Organa Grow or the Mushroom Compost. Top-dressing is done most often in the fall when you are prepping your lawn for overseeding or starting over. You can however do this in the spring as well, being careful not to put the material to thick to smoother out your lawn.

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Some formulas you may need to figure out the amount of material you need for your project:

Some formulas you may need to figure out the amount of material you need for your project:

Some formulas you may need to figure out the amount of material you need for your project:

Mulch: Length X Width / 100 = # of cubic yards for a 3" depth

​Topsoil: One Cubic Yard of Topsoil will cover 100 square feet 1" in depth.

Compost: 1 1/2 Cubic Yards of Compost will cover 1000 square feet top-dressed and 3 Cubic Yards per 1000 square feet tilled in 4-6 inches.

Stone: Length X Width / 9 X (inches) / 2000 / 1.5 = the number of yards you need
*inches are as follows: 1"=110  2"=220  3"=330  4"=440  5"=550